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GLAS - Traditional Farm Buildings

Bertie Hawe

Bertie Hawe is a suckler farmer living just outside Liscarroll in Co. Cork. As a current GLAS participant he was delighted to receive funding from the Department of Agriculture through the Heritage Council administered Traditional Farm Buildings Grant.

The pictures below show the building prior to any restoration work. This 17th century building was originally used for as a cow byre and the lofted section used for grain.

Photo 1: Building prior to work

Photo 2: Building after restoration work was completed in October 2021

Photo 3: Repair to the roof of the building

 Photo 4: Repair to the roof of the building

Better Built homes from Shanballymore carried out the work to the roof and small sections of repointing work. Where possible materials are reused to reduce the environment impact and carbon footprint of the restoration work. Approx 60% of the slates were reused. Mark Donnelly, Ballincollig carried out a bat & bird survey last July. Swallows were nesting in the building so work couldn’t start until September to allow the birds to leave their nests.

The Heritage Council administers the GLAS Traditional Farm Buildings Grant Scheme for the conservation and repair of traditional farm buildings and other related structures on behalf of the DAFM.

Grants awarded will not exceed 75% of the cost of the project, with a maximum grant of €25,000 and a minimum grant of €4000. Without this grant a lot of traditional farm buildings would continue to be in a state of disrepair. These traditional farm buildings add so much character to a farmyard and are an invaluable link to our past culture and heritage. The aim of the grant is to restore these buildings to be structurally sound with minimum intervention. Grants will also be available for other related structures such as historic yard surfaces and landscape features around the farmyard such as walls, gate pillars and gates. To be eligible for the scheme, buildings and other related structures (constructed before 1960) must have architectural or vernacular heritage character, make a contribution to their setting and not be overwhelmed by large-scale modern buildings. The building must continue to be used for agricultural purposes.


Michael & Evelyn O’Flynn

Conservation works have been carried out on the walled garden to the rear of Prohurst House. Stone work was carried out by Conor Kelleher (Mason/Contractor) for Evelyn and Michael O’ Flynn at Prohurst House, Prohurst, Co. Cork current GLAS participants. Southgate associates are acting as Conservation specialists on the project. The O’Flynn’s walled garden is likely late 18th to early-19th century in date and is an interesting feature of the overall estate and curtilage of Prohurst House. The project is funded by the Department of Agriculture and administered on their behalf by the Heritage Council for the conservation and repair of traditional farm buildings and other related structures on behalf of the DAFM.

Photo 1: Orchard Wall prior to restoration work

Photo 2: Orchard wall prior to restoration work

Photo 3: Section of capping completed to curved section of wall in front of house

Photo 4: Masonry repair along the lower course of the south west wall

Photo 5: View of repaired lower course of wall towards main house

The repointing and masonry repairs demonstrate an important traditional skill. This project is certainly a good example of what can be achieved using the conservation best practice of minimum intervention and when necessary, using materials and repairs on a like for like basis.

Wildlife considerations

While no ecological survey was required here, care has been taken to check the wall tops and vegetation prior to works commencing for any nesting birds or roosting bats. None of either were noted.

Michael and his family are very grateful to the Heritage Council (Anna Meenan) and the DAFM for the funding they received to complete these repair works. Without this scheme & funding, this orchard wall would have deteriorated over time and the associated history and heritage lost. It is so important that we hold onto as many of these old stone features as we possibly can. They are a vital link between our past & present lives and keep us connected to our ancestors.

Grants awarded will not exceed 75% of the cost of the project, with a maximum grant of €25,000 and a minimum grant of €4000. Without this grant a lot of traditional farm buildings & associated structures would continue to be in a state of disrepair. The aim of the grant is to restore these buildings & associated structures to be structurally sound with minimum intervention. To be eligible for the scheme, buildings and other related structures (constructed before 1960) must have architectural or vernacular heritage character, make a contribution to their setting and not be overwhelmed by large-scale modern buildings. The building must continue to be used for agricultural purposes.