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Research

Current research projects:

  • AgGenes (2015-2018): A Genomic Approach to Understanding and Improving Compost Utilisation
  • Agaricus Genomics (2015-2019). Genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of A. bisporus strains showing some resistance/tolerance to mushroom virus X (2015-2019
  • SafeMush (2014-2018): Assuring the safety of mushrooms by the introduction of novel processes to reduce environmental contamination in mushroom production facilities

Recently completed research projects

  • MushTV (2012-2015). Solutions for the mushroom industry to emerging disease threats from Trichoderma and Virus.
  • MVX Characterisation (2010-2015). Understanding the Biology of Mushroom Virus X by Molecular Characterisation, Location and Translocation of RNA and their Role in Disease Epidemiology. 
  • Trichoderma (2009-2013). Epidemiology and detection of Trichoderma aggressivum v. europaeum with particular reference to mushroom compost production in bulk Phase 3 systems. 
  • H2S in SMC. (2007-2013). Dynamics of hydrogen sulphide gas production in spent mushroom compost during storage and handling and its impact on Health and Safety issues 
  • Dry bubble disease. (2007-2010). Measuring and Managing Dry Bubble Disease Pressure on Mushroom Farms 
  • Mushroom Virus X disease (2007-2010). Understanding the factors which trigger “brown mushroom” symptom expression as a means to improved diagnosis and control.
  • MVX brown mushrooms. (2006-2010). Environmental and genetic control of brown colour development in mushrooms infected with mushroom virus X.

Teagasc has a successful history of supporting the Irish mushroom industry through its applied and strategic mushroom research programme. For 50 years mushroom research was based at the horticultural research centre in Kinsealy, North Dublin. In 2012 it was decided to relocate mushroom and horticulture research to Teagasc Food Research Centre in Ashtown, West Dublin. ,New state of the art mushroom growing rooms and glasshouses are being built.

Teagasc has responded well to most of the recommendations set out in the 2005 Mushroom Taskforce report. In particular Teagasc has been proactive in working and co-ordinating research projects with its sister organisation, AFBI, in Northern Ireland and third level universities and institutes in Ireland and UK. Both Teagasc and AFBI have been successful in securing competitive funding for mushroom research from government funding schemes, such as STIMULUS. Therer has also been a regular supply of Teagasc Walsh Fellowships, thereby educating a new generation of scientists in mushroom technologies.