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Sheep Newsletter - December 2021


Get the latest information & advice from the Teagasc Sheep team in this month's newsletter. It includes advice on grassland; scanning; housing; and health & safety. It also has a BETTER Farm Update on body condition & mating on the farms; and a Research Update on planing for 2022 in the INZAC flock.

View it here: Sheep Newsletter - December 2021 (PDF)

In this month's edition:

  • Grassland
    As we enter the final stages of the grazing year, it’s important to stay on track with the closing plan for your farm. March-lambing flocks need to have 60% of the sheep’s grazing area already closed by the start of December, with 80% closed by mid December. The final 20% will depend on the system and type of stock carried over and grazing conditions.
  • OviCast
    The Teagasc Sheep podcast has regular updates covering technical aspects on grassland, breeding, nutrition and health, as well as industry-focused episodes.
  • Scanning
    It is recommended to scan ewes at approximately 80 days post ram turnout. Those with split lambing periods (e.g., later-lambing ewe lambs) may need more than one scanning date to obtain the best results.
  • Housing
    Providing adequate feeding and lying space is essential, particularly during the latter stages of pregnancy. Avoid overcrowding pens as this can be a contributing factor to issues such as prolapse and other metabolic disorders that occur in late pregnancy.
  • BETTER Farm Update - What’s the condition?
    Frank Campion of the Animal & Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Athenry, Co. Galway reports on body condition and mating on the BETTER sheep farms.
  • Research Update - Planning for 2022
    Fiona McGovern of the Animal & Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Teagasc Athenry, Co. Galway reports on how reminiscing on 2021 allows for the planning of 2022 on the INZAC Flock.
  • Health & Safety - Prevent fire deaths in the farm home
    Irish research has shown that farmers and agricultural workers account for 20% of all fire deaths. Almost all fires occur in dwelling houses. This level is proportionately higher than other sectors.