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Time to Consider Sow Housing Options

Farmers are less than three years away from requirements under pig welfare legislation (S.I. 48 of 2008) that sows must be loose housed from four weeks after service until one week before expected farrowing date.

15 May 2010
Type
Media Article
2 Pages
76KB
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Today’s Farm – May / June 2010

Today's farm is a bi-monthly publication produced in a joint venture between Teagasc and the Agricultural Trust, publishers of the Irish Farmers Journal and The Irish Field.

14 May 2010
Type
Magazine
40 Pages
6,344KB
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Cost Implications of a Carbon Tax on Fuel

In this briefing note we examine the cost implications of the tax introduced on green diesel and other auto fuels as provided for in the 2010 Carbon Budget.

14 May 2010
Type
Submission
14 Pages
102KB
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Ballyhaise Dairy Open Day Proceedings

The dairy industry in Ireland is facing new and challenging times with the impending removal of the milk quota regime and volatility in milk price. Robust cows that will efficiently deliver high yields of milk solids from grazed grass, with consistently excellent fertility, will maximise profit regardless of future milk price volatility. Currently however, fertility performance (conception rates, survival and calving pattern) continues to be sub-optimal, eroding profit margins on Irish dairy farms and restricting the supply of high quality replacements. Data from the ICBF indicates that the average calving interval of Irish dairy herds is 389 days, with an average 6-week calving rate of 58% and 18% of cows recycled on a yearly basis. Similarly, indications are that reproductive performance on dairy farms in the northern half of the country is significantly poorer. This is a significant cost on the average dairy farm and reduces the supply of high EBI AI bred replacements thereby restricting Ireland’s ability to increase milk production in the future.

06 May 2010
Type
Event Proceeding
52 Pages
905KB
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National Soft Fruit Conference Proceedings 2010

Welcome to the 2010 Teagasc Soft Fruit Conference, held in association with the Irish Soft Fruit Growers’ Association (ISFGA) and Bord Bia. Protected strawberry production is now the mainstay of the soft fruit industry in Ireland. Large capital investments have been made by growers in protective cropping, including both glasshouse and tunnel structures. The main objective is the extension of the fruit season and the production of very high quality fruit, which is demanded by today’s consumer. The industry now produces at least 7,500 tonnes of fresh strawberries per year, worth an estimated €34 million. While the Dutch cultivar ‘Elsanta’ is the most popular cultivar grown, a number of other new cultivars also have some market share. The Irish industry, as a whole, is technically advanced and is continually making big strides to keep up with modern methods and new advances in crop husbandry. Although there are always major challenges to deal with, the future is very promising for forward looking, progressive soft fruit growers.

05 May 2010
Type
Event Proceeding
40 Pages
6,735KB
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National Farm Survey Report 2009

The National Farm Survey is designed to collect and analyse information relating to farming activities as its primary objective. Information and data relating to other activities by the household are considered secondary and as such where this information is presented it should be interpreted with caution. For 2009 there are 1,029 farms included in the analysis, representing 102,270 farms nationally. The population is based on the CSO 2007 Farm Structures Survey with farm typology based on the 2006 Standard Gross Margins (SGM).

01 May 2010
Type
Report
108 Pages
578KB