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Guidelines for Organic Farming

Organic farming can be a profitable alternative to conventional farming. At EU and global level the industry is experiencing rapid growth. Currently more than 31 million hectares of farmland are under organic management worldwide. The EU land area under organic management stands at 4% or six million hectares of the total area farmed. In Ireland the sector is growing steadily, yet remains relatively underdeveloped with less than 1% of the total farming area now farmed organically. At the end of 2007 1,121 organic operators were registered with the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and the area farmed organically was approximately 40,000 hectares.

24 February 2009
Type
Booklet
45 Pages
476KB
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Nutrient Management on Organic Farms

The management of nutrients in organic farming systems presents a formidable challenge, as the use of inorganic fertilisers is not permitted. Therefore organic farmers must optimise a range of soil, crop, rotation and manure managements to ensure a nutrient supply which will guarantee optimum crop yields and minimise losses to the environment. To achieve this objective, an appreciation of the nutrient cycles in farming systems is essential.

01 December 2008
Type
Report
40 Pages
1,153KB
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Grassland Management on Organic Farms

For many Irish farms the simplest and most financially rewarding system of production will be based on maximizing the use of grazed grass. With good grassland management it is possible to have a long grazing season of high quality feed at low cost. On an organic farm, clover is the driver of grassland production.

01 November 2008
Type
Booklet
16 Pages
721KB
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Organic Cattle / Sheep Production

Organic produce is one of the few expanding markets in the food and farming sector. This expansion is consumer driven. The greatest demand is for fruit and vegetables but this follows through to a much wider range of products, i.e., dairy products, meat, processed foods etc. Market surveys in Europe and all over the world show a huge scope for expansion in organic produce.

01 June 2006
Type
Factsheet
2 Pages
76KB
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Organic Potatoes

Consumer interest in organic food has expanded rapidly in recent years. While production of food to organic standards has also expanded, output is still not sufficient to meet demand. Consumers have to put up with intermittent supply and imported produce. Home grown organic fruit and vegetables are always in scarce supply. One of the basics of an Irish diet is potatoes and growing potatoes organically as part of a rotation on an organic unit would produce a very saleable commodity.

01 May 2006
Type
Factsheet
2 Pages
107KB
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Assessment of Marketing Channels for Conversion Grade Products

The purpose of this report is to assess marketing channels for conversion grade products as outlined in WP3 of the technical annex. The evaluation from the organic farmer and retailer perspective supplements the previous work package (WP2) that examined factors affecting conventional farmers considering conversion to organic farming.

01 August 2003
Type
Report
70 Pages
531KB
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Conversion to Organic Farming: Case Study Report Ireland

In Ireland approximately 60% (29,999 ha total land under organic) or 17,985 ha are in conversion with 12,014 ha fully organic. Of the 1083 registered producers 65% are in meat production with 40% in beef and 25% in sheep meat production. Vegetable production accounts for a further 13%, with cereals, milk, poultry and fruit making up the remainder.

01 January 2003
Type
Working Paper
34 Pages
192KB