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Where Have All the Pigs Come From?

In the first four months of 2011, pig slaughterings in licensed export plants in the Republic of Ireland amounted to just under 910,000 or an average of 53,509 pigs per week. This is an increase of almost 4,500 pigs per week or 9% compared with the same period in 2010 when the average per week was 49,023. However, there has been no reduction in the live export of pigs for slaughter in Northern Ireland – in fact these have increased slightly (Table2).

02 May 2011
Type
Media Article
56KB
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Today’s Farm – May / June 2011

Beware of the bull Wexford sheep group focus on profit Contractor happy with switch to organic beef Rejuvenating swards in Kerry Managing grass in the silly season Strategies for quota management Sweet rewards from nutrient management How the clash of the ash yields cash

26 April 2011
Type
Magazine
6,621KB
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EBI Open Day 20/04/2011

Acorn Discussion Group - Open Day on the Farm of Eamonn Duggan

20 April 2011
Type
Event Proceeding
123KB
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JFC Innovation Awards 2011 Proceedings

The JFC Innovation Awards, are sponsored by JFC, and organised jointly by Teagasc, the Department of Agriculture in Northern Ireland, the Irish Farmers’ Journal and the Irish Local Development Network.

20 April 2011
Type
Event Proceeding
3,983KB
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Teagasc Road Maps - Suckler Beef

Irish agriculture is facing a period of change. The Food Harvest 2020 report sets out ambitious targets for the agriculture and food industry. Teagasc has outlined the developments required for each of the major farming enterprises and the food sector over the next seven years to 2018. The nine Teagasc Road Maps covering dairy, suckler beef, pigs, sheep, tillage, forestry, horticulture, food and the environment, summarize the expected changes in the shape and size of the individual sectors in the context of the main market and policy issues facing Irish producers in each enterprise. The Road Maps specifically set out the technical performance required at farm level to meet these targets. They take account of environmental and land use implications of these changes and Food Harvest 2020.

15 April 2011
Type
Factsheet
117KB
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Teagasc Road Maps - Environment

Irish agriculture is facing a period of change. The Food Harvest 2020 report sets out ambitious targets for the agriculture and food industry. Teagasc has outlined the developments required for each of the major farming enterprises and the food sector over the next seven years to 2018. The nine Teagasc Road Maps covering dairy, suckler beef, pigs, sheep, tillage, forestry, horticulture, food and the environment, summarize the expected changes in the shape and size of the individual sectors in the context of the main market and policy issues facing Irish producers in each enterprise. The Road Maps specifically set out the technical performance required at farm level to meet these targets. They take account of environmental and land use implications of these changes and Food Harvest 2020.

15 April 2011
Type
Factsheet
213KB
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Teagasc Road Maps - Pigs

Irish agriculture is facing a period of change. The Food Harvest 2020 report sets out ambitious targets for the agriculture and food industry. Teagasc has outlined the developments required for each of the major farming enterprises and the food sector over the next seven years to 2018. The nine Teagasc Road Maps covering dairy, suckler beef, pigs, sheep, tillage, forestry, horticulture, food and the environment, summarize the expected changes in the shape and size of the individual sectors in the context of the main market and policy issues facing Irish producers in each enterprise. The Road Maps specifically set out the technical performance required at farm level to meet these targets. They take account of environmental and land use implications of these changes and Food Harvest 2020.

15 April 2011
Type
Factsheet
155KB