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Traditional Buildings on Irish Farms

Ireland’s landscape is enriched by its heritage of farmhouses and outbuildings, its field patterns and the nature of the boundaries that divide them. The landscape of Ireland is predominantly an agricultural one, and farmers have been its guardians. In times past, the occupants of traditional farmhouses and their associated farmsteads were often also their builders.They made clever use of materials available locally and they built in accordance with a language of construction that was shared by their community.

01 September 2009
Type
Book
2,120KB
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TResearch: Autumn 2009

Teagasc Research Magazine - Autumn Edition 2009 Discovering subsurface denitrification Measuring farm sustainability The power of plants

11 August 2009
Type
Magazine
1,365KB
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Pig Conference 2008

National Pig Conference 2008 Proceedings

06 August 2009
Type
Event Proceeding
6,644KB
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Situation and Outlook in Irish Agriculture - 2009 Mid Year Review

The ongoing global economic crisis conditions the outlook for dairy, beef, sheep and cereals in 2009. While cost inflation was the main influence on farm margins in 2008, changes in output prices are the main factor behind the story for 2009. Dairy and cereal enterprises will experience the greatest difficulties in 2009 due to substantial decreases in milk and grain prices relative to 2008. Reductions in input expenditure on dairy and cereal farms will be moderate and, as a consequence, negative net margins will be widespread. By contrast, in 2009 output value will decline on beef and sheep enterprises due to falling prices, but margins may actually increase as these output price reductions are more than offset by savings in input expenditure.

01 August 2009
Type
Report
65KB
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Farmland Habitats

Most of Ireland is farmed in some way, ranging from the intensively managed arable land in the east to small wet fields in the west. Because so much of the land is farmed, Irish wildlife depends heavily on the habitats that exist on farms. A properly managed farm is a good place for wildlife and offers a variety of places in which plants and animals can live.

01 August 2009
Type
Book
2,378KB